. But when exactly?

The whole of the US – as well as potentially some of the Europe and the UK – is about to see one of the greatest sights in the solar system, as the moon moves in front of the sun and blocks it out. It’ll go all the way across the country, giving people the chance to see the strange, sublime sight for the first time in years.

The eclipse won’t last long, and much of the joy of it is seeing the build-up. So you’ll want to make sure you’re outside in enough time to get ready – and, importantly, put your glasses on.

Total eclipse passes across the US as many states are thrown into darkness

Finding the actual time it all happens is a little complicated. Part of the joy of this eclipse is that it’s the first time in 99 years that it will cross the entire country, but that also makes it a little more complicated because it goes across four timezones.

But thankfully Nasa has provided a full breakdown of all the times, and the path it will take as it crosses the country. And it even uses local timezones, avoiding the large potential for confusion.

In general, the eclipse will get to you some point around midday. It’ll be earlier on the west coast, both in terms of local time and in absolute terms.

Solar eclipse 2017 Solar eclipse 2017

One important note is that the map above shows when the eclipse will be at its fullest. So in fact you’ll want to step outside some time before that, if you want to get the full view and see everything go from light, to dark, to light again.

The other big variable depends on how far north or south you are: if you’re in the “path of totality”, marked in grey on the map, you’ll see everything.

The lines sweeping west to east on the map show how much of the sun will disappear where you are. But at this point there’s very little you can do about that anyway.

If you do want to get a full view, or are worried about missing it, then .

For full information on .

The latest live coverage from The Independent:

Live Updates While we’re waiting, how about a little Bonnie Tyler?
Bonnie Tyler – Total Eclipse of the Heartby bonnietylerVEVO via

That’s not entirely a spurious attempt to link a mind-blowing song with a topical event. Or rather, it is that, but Ms Tyler herself is taking part in that entirely unsubtle exercise, and singing the song live on a cruise ship as the eclipse happens The IndependentIt had to happen.  Bonnie Tyler will perform her 1983 hit “Total Eclipse of the Heart” during the solar eclipse, set to occur across the US on 21 August, while onboard Royal Caribbean’s Total Eclipse Cruise.  Not long now – the shadow starts to arrive on the west coast in about half an hour. Though it’ll be another hour or so before “totality” arrives, and the sun disappears completely. Almost everyone on the path of the total eclipse will get a clear view of what’s going on, the Associated Press reports.

Forecasters say it looks like a big chunk of the nation on the path of the total eclipse will get clear viewing for the sky show.

National Weather Service meteorologist Patrick Burke says about 70 percent of the area on the 70-mile path stretching from Oregon to South Carolina is likely to have clear skies when the moon moves in front of the sun.

Burke says it looks good for the Pacific Northwest, the Northern Rockies, Tennessee, Kentucky, and into western South Carolina.

The toughest areas are coastal South Carolina, eastern Nebraska, north and central Missouri and Illinois. Burke says those areas will have thick clouds and have to dodge pop-up thunderstorms.

Astronomers say clouds and rainstorm make it difficult to see the classic image of the blotted out sun. That’s in contrast with the UK, where it’s going to be cloudy and mostly invisible The IndependentThe eclipse might be ruined before it even started. And by that most British of enemies: the weather. Eclipse viewers, many of them slathered with sunscreen, are streaming into the noisy Nashville Zoo hours early to see both the eclipse and animals’ weird reactions to it.

Zoo spokesman Jim Bartoo says people were camping out at the zoo entrance at 6 a.m., three hours before the gates opened and seven-and-a-half hours before totality.

Paulette Simmons of Nashville came to the zoo after a doctor’s appointment, saying she decided on the location because she wanted to see how the animals reacted.

The flamingo lagoon is one of the most popular locales, with the birds expected to roost and get noisy when the sun darkens.

Ninety minutes after the zoo opened, the pathways were clogged with people. The eclipse is here!!! (Sort of.) For some people in Oregon, the moon has started taking a bite out of the sun, and it’s HERE. You can watch the once-in-a-lifetime event here: Both of South Carolina’s political parties are trying to capitalize on the eclipse in fundraising campaigns.

In an email titled “‘Eclipse’ the Democrats!” the South Carolina Republican Party on Monday asked donors to contribute $20.18 toward the party’s efforts to “keep Democrats TOTALLY in the dark” in next year’s elections. Republicans now hold all statewide elected offices and control both chambers of South Carolina’s Legislature.

In a message of their own, the state’s Democratic Party sent supporters links to recent political articles in several outlets reminding them of work ahead of the party.

The party told supporters, “Nobody go blind today, there’s too much work to do for Democrats all across the state!” The IndependentCrowds along the West Coast of the United States have been awed by the eclipse of the Sun, as the celestial phenomenon started to become visible to the first Americans in the path of totality that runs directly over Washington State. Alex Jones says people are saying the eclipse is racist. Unconfirmed at this point.
🌚 🌞The left wants you to think is racist. RT if you disagree!

In Depoe Bay, Oregon, just south of where the phenomenon will first appear at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1715 GMT), thick fog shrouded the water on Monday morning, with the sun hidden behind a curtain of mist and clouds. Visitors had taken every parking space along the sea wall by 6 a.m.

Some 94 minutes after its debut, at 2:49 p.m. EDT (1849 GMT), totality will take its final bow near Charleston, South Carolina, where eclipse gazers on Monday morning were gathering atop the harbor’s sea wall.

Officials said Charleston County’s 16,000 hotel rooms were booked, and police expected up to 100,000 visitors to the area.

Nancy Conway, 57, an elementary school principal, said she made the long drive from Lynn, Massachusetts, with a car full of relatives.

“Twenty hours, three drivers, four adults, two 6-year-old twins,” Conway said as she sat in a lawn chair facing the harbor. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

A number of towns within the total eclipse‘s path set up viewing parties. At the Southern Illinois University campus in Carbondale, Illinois, the 15,000-seat football stadium was sold out for Monday.

“I woke up at 4 a.m. so I’m excited,” said Madeline Rubin, 17, who drove two hours to the stadium with others wearing T-shirts that said “I totally blacked out.

The last time such a spectacle unfolded from the Pacific to the Atlantic was in 1918. The last total eclipse seen anywhere in the United States took place in 1979.

For millions of others outside the zone of “totality,” a partial eclipse of the sun will appear throughout North America if there is no local cloud cover, a spectacle that was expected to draw its own crowds.

In Washington, D.C., hundreds of people waited in long lines outside the National Air and Space Museum, which was distributing more than 20,000 pairs of free viewing glasses. Residents of the nation’s capital will see 81 percent of the sun obscured at the eclipse‘s peak around 2:24 p.m.

Taylor Swift might be looking to do a surprise release of her album during the solar eclipse. But Wolves In The Throne Room have beaten her to it! You can stream their new track on Adult Swim: Adult Swim Singles 2017Adult Swim Singles 2017 brings you 52 weeks of free music. First pictures coming in from Nasa And here’s a similar picture. Can you spot the difference? That’s right – that little black square is the International Space Station, photobombing the eclipse! HA HA HA I’ve blocked the Sun! Make way for the Moon.

President Donald Trump plans to watch the solar eclipse from a White House balcony.

The White House said Monday that the president and first lady will take in the cosmic spectacle from the Truman balcony on the second floor of the residence, overlooking the South Lawn.

This is the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the United States from coast to coast in nearly a century. Compared to the 14 states that will see a total eclipse, Washington will experience a partial eclipse.

The eclipse was expected to be the most watched and photographed in history. After weeks of anticipation, the sight of the moon’s silhouette passing directly in front of the sun, blotting out all but a halo-like solar corona and causing a precipitous drop in temperature, drew whoops and cheers from onlookers gathered at Roshambo ArtFarm in Sheridan, Oregon.

“It was incredible,” said Cheryl Laroche, 57, who along with her husband, Rob, planned their eclipse trip for about a year. “It was literally cold and dark. The light was blue. It wasn’t eerie. It was just different.”

The rare cosmic event was expected to draw one of the largest audiences in human history, including those watching through broadcast and social media.

Some 12 million people live in the 70-mile-wide (113-km-wide), 2,500-mile-long (4,000-km-long) zone where the total eclipse was to appear, while hordes of others traveled to spots along the route.

The eclipse first reached totality in Oregon at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1715 GMT) and began marching slowly eastward across the country. The phenomenon will take its final bow at 2:49 p.m. EDT (1849 GMT) near Charleston, South Carolina, where eclipse gazers gathered atop the harbor’s sea wall.

Nancy Conway, 57, an elementary school principal, said she and her family made the drive to Charleston from Lynn, Massachusetts.

“Twenty hours, three drivers, four adults, two 6-year-old twins,” Conway said as she sat in a lawn chair facing the harbor. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

A number of towns within the total eclipse’s path set up viewing parties. At the Southern Illinois University campus in Carbondale, Illinois, the 15,000-seat football stadium was sold out for Monday.

“I woke up at 4 a.m. so I’m excited,” said Madeline Rubin, 17, who drove two hours to the stadium with others wearing T-shirts that said “I totally blacked out.”

The last time such a spectacle unfolded from the Pacific to the Atlantic was in 1918. The last total eclipse seen anywhere in the United States took place in 1979.

For millions of others outside the zone of “totality,” a partial eclipse of the sun will appear throughout North America, a spectacle that was expected to draw its own crowds.

In Washington, D.C., hundreds of people waited in long lines outside the National Air and Space Museum, which was distributing more than 20,000 pairs of free viewing glasses. Residents of the nation’s capital will see 81 percent of the sun obscured at the eclipse’s peak around 2:24 p.m.

FAMILY OUTINGS

Daniel Berger, 33, a software developer from New York, said he has been waiting with his wife and their two children for almost an hour.

“This is a far larger crowd than I anticipated,” he said. “It’s the first non-political attraction for D.C. in many years, so that’s nice.”

Perhaps never before have so many people had the opportunity to see a total eclipse, said cartographer Michael Zeiler, who maintains the website and is a self-described “eclipse chaser” who on Monday will mark his ninth time seeing “totality.”

Zeiler estimated up to 7.4 million people traveled to the zone to observe the total eclipse, which is taking place in the peak vacation month of August.

Many people trekked to remote national forests and parks of Oregon, Idaho and Wyoming. Those who live along the path, which cuts through a few population centers like Kansas City, Missouri, and Nashville, Tennessee, can simply walk out their homes and look skyward.

For those who live too far from the shadow’s path or cannot escape the indoors, a NASA-linked website, eclipse.stream.live, and a companion mobile app provided a live stream filmed from the vantage point of 50 helium-filled balloons at a height of 80,000 feet (24,384 meters).

The sun’s disappearing act is just part of the show. As the black orb of the moon nibbles away at the sun’s face, the heavens dim to a quasi-twilight and some stars and planets will be visible.

The last glimmer of sun gives way to a momentary sparkle known as the “diamond ring” effect just before the sun slips completely behind the moon, leaving only the aura of its outer atmosphere, or corona, visible.

The corona, lasting just two minutes, marks the peak phase of totality and the only stage of the eclipse safe to view with the naked eye. The eclipse has now gone over just about everywhere it’s going to (with the exception of its later, and mostly invisible, visit to the UK). So if you’re not outside watching it, you’re about to miss it!!

Please allow a moment for the live blog to load.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here